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Research Seminar Series

We run a DIR Seminar Series where group members, visitors and guests present their work followed by lively discussions. The seminars are run every Friday at 10am in the Informatics Forum. The organiser of the series is Dr Rosa Filgueira Vicente.

We also list talks relevant to our work in the seminar series from the Centre for Intelligent Systems and their Applications (CISA), the Software Systems and Processes research group (SPP).

Automated Mapping of Web Services via the OpenKnowledge System

Speaker: 
Fiona McNeill

The OpenKnowledge system supports a peer-to-peer network and is designed to allow predefined workflows - or Interaction Models (IMs) - to be shared across the network. These IMs allow peers with no previous knowledge of one another to interact successfully by taking on a role in the interaction. Since these peers are likely to have different ontologies, mapping is performed to allow them to successfully interpret their role in terms of their own ontology.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 13 February, 2008 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

Orchestrating Data-centric Workflows

Speaker: 
Adam Barker

When orchestrating data-centric workflows as are commonly found in the sciences, centralised servers can become a bottleneck to the performance of a workflow; output from service invocations are always transferred via a centralised orchestration engine, when they should be passed directly to where they are needed at the next service in the workflow. To address this performance bottleneck, this talk presents a lightweight architecture based on a centralised control flow, distributed data flow model.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 6 February, 2008 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

Computational Chemistry at EaStCHEM

Speaker: 
Andrew Turner

The EaStCHEM Research Computing Facility (RCF) has been set up to allow non-computationally orientated research chemists to make use of the latest computational tools. This will open up new avenues of research and lead to further innovation. One way in which the power of computational chemistry could be opened up to the lay-user is through the use of portals and grid computing. Although we now have a functioning EaStCHEM grid, we do not have any simple, graphical interfaces to allow users to access it. We hope that, in collaboration with NeSC, we will be able to develop such interfaces.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 30 January, 2008 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Cramond

Acronym Soup - the ECDF meets NGS and EGEE

Speaker: 
Sam Skipsey

The Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility, the University of Edinburgh's centralised computing service, has already proven to be a useful resource for local researchers. Now, with the second phase of expansion due to triple its compute capacity in the next few weeks, it is also available to other users via Grid Middleware interfaces.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 23 January, 2008 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

Peer to peer knowledge sharing in support of science

Speaker: 
Dave Robertson

Although the inspirational parts of science remain an art, large parts of of the supporting infrastructure that makes this art possible are more routine: thinks like experimental protocols, repeatability analysis, archiving of results or systematic reviewing. I will speculatively discuss how much of this might be supported by peer to peer automation using simple but non-speculative examples described in the LCC language used in the OpenKnowledge project.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 16 January, 2008 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Cramond

The OpenKnowledge framework: its architecture and case study applications

Speaker: 
Paolo Besana

In this talk I will present the OpenKnowledge framework and its current test applications in the case study scenarios (emergency response and bioinformatics). The framework, initially developed as a testing ground for the ideas emerging from the OpenKnowledge project, has grown into a working system that has recently seen the first release.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 12 December, 2007 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Cramond

Device Binding for Adaptive Multimodal Interfaces

Speaker: 
Srihathai Prammanee

Multimodal interaction is one of the taxonomies for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). With the introduction of multimodal interactions, input/output information is becoming associated with the different human senses so that information can be presented in the most efficient and natural way. However, in mobile communication, a number of restrictions are still remnant. Mostly, these restrictions are caused by limitations of a mobile terminal’s user interfaces.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 21 November, 2007 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

TaWeka: from biological web services to data mining

Speaker: 
Luna De Ferrari

TaWeka (Taverna-to-Weka) is a Java application that connects data gathering in Taverna with data mining using Weka. The aim is to speed up the creation and comparison of biological classifiers, while simplifying sharing and reuse.

TaWeka:

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 14 November, 2007 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

Data Integration and Workflows

Speaker: 
Kostas Karasavvas

For several years workflows have been used as a means of orchestrating Web services (among other tasks). The increased availability nowadays of on-line data resources has created the need of an efficient way of accessing and integrating this data. workflows, orchestrating services that access these resources, seem like the natural way to accomplish said task but how does this relate to work in data integration? Significant work on data integration has been done over the last decades and although there is still progress to be made, the field is quite mature.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 7 November, 2007 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

Transaction-Based Grid Database Replication

Speaker: 
Yin Chen

We present a framework for grid database replication. Data replication is one of the most useful strategies to achieve high levels of availability and fault tolerance as well as minimal access time in grids. It is commonly demanded by many grid applications. However, most existing grid replication systems only deal with read-only files. By contrast, several relational database vendors provide tools that offer transaction-based replication, but the capabilities of these products are insufficient to address grid issues.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 24 October, 2007 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

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