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Research Seminar Series

We run a DIR Seminar Series where group members, visitors and guests present their work followed by lively discussions. The seminars are run every Friday at 10am in the Informatics Forum. The organiser of the series is Dr Rosa Filgueira Vicente.

We also list talks relevant to our work in the seminar series from the Centre for Intelligent Systems and their Applications (CISA), the Software Systems and Processes research group (SPP).

Using Semantic Web technologies to represent clinical trial selection criteria

CISA Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Paolo Besana, Rennes University

Clinical trials are essential to verify the effectiveness of medical treatments and procedures. In order to be considered valid, a clinical trial needs to involve a large number of patients with specific conditions. Selecting enough patient with matching conditions is hard, and many clinical trials fail because of the lack of participants. In the case of cancer, the decision of putting a patient on a trial is taken during multi-disciplinary meetings, where different aspects of each case are collectively reviewed in few minutes.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 31 March, 2010 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF431

Explaining Anomalies in the Intensive Care Unit

CISA Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Laura Moss, Glasgow Royal Infirmary and University of Aberdeen

Anomalies identify a mismatch between a prediction (often grounded in domain theories) and observations, indicating that the theory requires refinement. Early approaches to the revision of knowledge captured in a knowledge-based system generated refinements to remove an anomaly; these refinements were generally produced after applying machine learning techniques to extensive datasets (such datasets are not always available), moreover, the refinements generated are not always acceptable to domain experts.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 17 March, 2010 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IFG03

Systems biology of transcription and splicing in yeast

CISA Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Stuart Aitken

Transcription produces RNA from DNA, and this information is subsequently translated into protein. Transcription is a complex process involving the removal of non-coding sequences (introns). This editing operation is known as splicing, and is responsible for the generation of 100K proteins from only 20K genes in human. Defects in splicing are linked with disease, and hence it is important to understand this process fully. This talk will introduce the biological background and present stochastic models of transcription and splicing.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 10 March, 2010 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF431

Why efforts toward standardisation of data and results from array-based gene-expression studies continue to fall short

CISA Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Rob Kitchen

High-throughput array-based screens are a popular experimental technique employed by molecular biologists in their endeavour to unravel highly complex gene-interactions. Over the past decade a wealth of research has focused on the development of advanced statistical techniques with which to interrogate these large datasets. Simultaneously, a similar level of effort has been expended in the development of large-scale, open access data repositories and accompanying standards for the reporting of experiment metadata.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 3 March, 2010 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF116

Graph transformation and intuitionistic linear logic

CISA Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Paolo Torrini

Graph transformation has been used in the model-driven development of object-oriented programs as well as in the modelling of concurrent systems. The application of a transformation rule can be characterised algebraically as a construction of a double-pushout diagram in the category of graphs. We show how intuitionistic linear logic with proof terms can be extended with resource-bound quantification, allowing for an implicit handling of the double-pushout conditions, and how resource logic can be used to reason about reachability in graph transformation systems

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 24 February, 2010 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF431

Automated Experimentation as a Means to Promote Computational Thinking in the Sciences

e-Science Institute Public Lecture
Speaker: 
Dave Robertson

We already have glimpsed what computation can do for the traditional sciences when used as a tool in support of conventional experiments. The tools that have been built, or soon will be built, allow experiments at a scale and intensity that were difficult to imagine even a few years ago.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 23 February, 2010 - 16:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Newhaven

Flybrain Neuron Database, a comprehensive online database of the Drosophila brain neurons

ANC Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Pro Kei Ito

Morphological and functional knowledge of the neurons of the Drosophila melanogaster brain has been accumulated drastically, thanks to the recent improvements in visualization techniques. Identified neurons, however, have been reported in diverse publications with inconsistent formats, making it very difficult to acquire comprehensive overview about what is known and what remains uninvestigated. To address this problem, we developed an online database, called Flybrain Neuron Database, which aims to collect information about all the Drosophila brain neurons reported so far.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 19 January, 2010 - 11:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF431
Projects: 

Warehouse-scale Computing

Informatics Distinguished Lecture
Speaker: 
Luiz André Barroso, Google

A model of computing that involves applications and services offered remotely by large-scale datacenters has been increasing in popularity, due in large part to the efficiencies achievable by co-locating vast computing and storage capabilities and by amortizing their cost over many users and applications. Achieving such large efficiencies in practice, however, requires further understanding of this new computing platform; how to design it and how to best program it.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 2 December, 2009 - 16:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
LT1

Automated Ontology Evolution

The Hamming Seminars
Speaker: 
Alan Bundy

Most work on automated reasoning is based on manually-built representations of knowledge. There is, however, suggestive evidence that human representations evolve both between and within episodes of reasoning. Unfortunately, how to automate the evolution of representations is a neglected problem in informatics. Challenges such as managing: the interaction of multiple agents; and the co-development of programs and their specifications, have it urgent to address this problem. Our improved understanding of representations and their relationships to reasoning techniques has made it timely.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 28 October, 2009 - 04:00
Length: 
75 minutes
Location: 
IF431

Towards Supporting Data-Intensive Research

CISA Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Jano van Hemert

Science, society and business is witnessing a data revolution. Data are now generated by faster and cheaper physical technologies, software tools and digital collaborations. Examples of these include satellite networks, simulation models and social network data. To successfully transform these data into information then into knowledge and finally into wisdom, we need new forms of computational thinking.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 13 October, 2009 - 13:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IFG07A

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