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Research Seminar Series

We run a DIR Seminar Series where group members, visitors and guests present their work followed by lively discussions. The seminars are run every Friday at 10am in the Informatics Forum. The organiser of the series is Dr Rosa Filgueira Vicente.

We also list talks relevant to our work in the seminar series from the Centre for Intelligent Systems and their Applications (CISA), the Software Systems and Processes research group (SPP).

The semantic web basics-RDF, SPARQL and OWL

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Carlos Buil Aranda

This talk will give an introduction of semantic web basics: RDF, SPARQL and OWL, and then followed by a practical
showcase --- the work that I have done while visiting NeSC and EPCC at the University of Edinburgh for the last two months.

Date and time: 
Friday, 25 September, 2009 - 10:30
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Cramond
Projects: 

Presentations from MSc student projects summer 2009

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Informatics and e-Science MSc Students

Our MSc Students will give presentations regarding their work done so far. The speakers and the titles for each of projects are as follows:
1. Create Parallel Data Mining Algorithms for Cloud Computing(the speaker: Tantana Saengngam)
2. Generate A Portal for Brain Imaging(the speaker: Albert Heyrovsky)
3. Grid-enable A Biomedical Database(the speaker: Mark MacGillivray)

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 12 August, 2009 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Cramond

Frequent Pattern Mining for Microarray Data

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Andrei Lyashko

Frequent Pattern Mining (FPM) represents a very recent field of data mining and an evolutionary technique to ARM. Recalling an example from ARM, frequent pattern is simply a set {A, C} with no implication and is therefore only categorised by the support, which is basically the number of joint occurrences of all elements in the set.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 5 August, 2009 - 10:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Cramond

Graph vertex colouring through clustering

e-Science Institute Public Lecture
Speaker: 
István Juhos

Graph vertex colouring is part of an important family of computer science problems: constraint satisfaction. In previous decades, many combinatorial problem solvers have been introduced to tackle this problem. More recently, heuristic algorithms have become a popular approach. We introduce a new heuristic approach to approximate a solution to the graph vertex colouring problem. It uses a clustering applied to the vertices, where the clusters identify independent sets of vertices. These clusters are then translated into a valid colouring of the vertices.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 18 August, 2009 - 16:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Newhaven

Next Generation Sky Surveys

e-Science Institute Public Lecture
Speaker: 
Dr Bob Mann

Systematic surveys of large fractions of the sky, undertaken in different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are becoming an increasingly important part of observational astronomy. Thanks to advances in detector technologies, astronomers can now survey the sky ever faster, producing ever larger volumes of data. The next generation of sky surveys — due to start operations within the next five to ten years — will represent a

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 7 July, 2009 - 16:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Newhaven

How Web 2.0 Technologies and Innovations are Changing e-Research Activities

e-Science Institute Public Lecture
Speaker: 
Prof. Mark Baker

Technologies of various types appear in waves. Some are taken up and are successful, and others die out quickly. These innovations include new hardware, operating systems, tools and utilities, as well as applications, and also, the way users interact with systems. The Web 2.0 arena seems to have been one of those areas that has taken off and changed the way we do things; not only on the Internet, but also via the Web.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 16 June, 2009 - 16:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Newhaven

Tutorial on Infer.NET

Research Programme on Machine Learning
Speaker: 
John Winn, Microsoft Research, Cambridge

Infer.NET is a .NET framework for machine learning. It provides state-of-the-art message-passing algorithms and statistical routines for performing Bayesian inference. It has applications in a wide variety of domains including information retrieval, bioinformatics, epidemiology, vision, and many others.

See http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/cambridge/projects/infernet/

There will be a tea break 4-4.15pm in MiniForum 2.

Date and time: 
Monday, 4 May, 2009 - 15:00
Length: 
120 minutes
Location: 
IF431

Planning Emergency Movement for the Built Environment

SSP Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Thomas French

This talk will detail work investigating the planning of emergency movement for the built environment. It is proposed to model building circulation systems using stochastic, time-dependent flow networks that attempt to capture the uncertain and transient conditions of an emergency event. A stochastic combinatorial optimisation problem is formulated with the goal of finding plans that minimise the risk taken by the paths with the highest risk. We will detail the problem complexity and the proposed solution approach, based on Evolutionary Algorithms.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 28 April, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF115

Enabling Multiple Experts Achieve (greater) Consensus on (Classification) Tasks

CISA Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Derek Sleeman, Department of Computing Science, University of Aberdeen

This project focuses on developing techniques which enable an expert to detect inconsistencies in two (or more) perspectives on the same (classification) task. Further, the INSIGHT system has been developed to support domain experts exploring, and removing inconsistencies in their conceptualization of a task. I will discuss a study with Intensive Care clinicians whose high-level task was to classify, on a five-point scale (A-E), the (hourly) reports produced by an Intensive Care Unit's patient management system.

Date and time: 
Monday, 27 April, 2009 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF431

UG4-2008/2009 Student Presentations

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Andrei Lyashko, Carl Orebäck and Matthew Carr

The following Informatics students will give a 20-minute presentation each about their UG4-2008/2009 project.

Association Rules Applied to Microarray Results from a Cystic Fibrosis Study
Andrei Lyashko
http://research.nesc.ac.uk/node/237

Generating Graphical User Interfaces for Grid Computing Portals
Carl Orebäck
http://research.nesc.ac.uk/node/238

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 14 April, 2009 - 14:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Cramond

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