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Research Seminar Series

We run a DIR Seminar Series where group members, visitors and guests present their work followed by lively discussions. The seminars are run every Friday at 10am in the Informatics Forum. The organiser of the series is Dr Rosa Filgueira Vicente.

We also list talks relevant to our work in the seminar series from the Centre for Intelligent Systems and their Applications (CISA), the Software Systems and Processes research group (SPP).

Retrofitting a dynamic path finding mechanism to a static path finder

SSP Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Phil Graham

This talk will detail one approach to making an already available path finder dynamic (different paths generated for different terrain utilities). It is assumed that a path finder already exists (but the algorithm is not known) and that all the information given about the terrain to be traversed is that it is made entirely of 3D navigational points. Some basic results/scenarios are presented showing how the path finder can be used to generate different paths.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 17 March, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF115

RPML Tea Meeting

Research Programme on Machine Learning
Speaker: 
Chris Williams, Organiser

The first RPML tea meeting will be held on Thursday 19 March 3.30-4.30 pm in Mini-Forum 1 (level 2) in the Informatics Forum. Tea/coffee and biscuits will be provided, and there will also be a number of posters presented. The idea is to have a bi-monthly RPML meeting of which this is the first. All staff and students with an interest in machine learning are welcome to attend.

Date and time: 
Thursday, 19 March, 2009 - 15:30
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IFMF1

Developing dependable agents in a dynamic world

SSP Seminar Series
Speaker: 
iona McNeill and Lucas Dixon

As the world of software agents diversifies, systems such as the Semantic Web hope to maintain service interoperability. However, when agents are developed independently, and continue to evolve to meet a wide range of demands, maintaining robust interoperable behaviour is increasingly difficult.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 3 March, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
IF115

Computational Thinking in Music Composition

Computational Thinking Seminar
Speaker: 
Michael Edwards (Music, ACE, University of Edinburgh)

Despite the still-prevalent but essentially nineteenth century perception of the creative artist, an algorithmic approach to music composition has been in evidence in western classical music for at least one thousand years. The history of algorithmic composition--from both before and after the invention of the digital computer--will be presented along with musical examples of the distant and recent past. The author's own work will then be placed in this context, focussing upon recent compositions for instruments and computer created with custom software developed in Common Lisp.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 25 March, 2009 - 16:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IFG03

Plans, Actions and Dialogue using Linear Logic

SSP Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Lucas Dixon

I will describe a framework, based on Linear Logic, for finding and executing plans that include dialogue. In particular, this provides a model that gives significant reuse of agent specifications and makes agents robust to unexpected events and failures. Using Linear logic as the foundational machinery improves upon previous dialogue systems by providing a clear underlying logical model for both planning and execution. The resulting framework has been implemented and several case studies have been considered.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 24 February, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF115

Parallel Simulation of the Storage Management of Large Parallel and Distributed Architectures Using SIMCAN

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Dr. Javier Fernndez Muoz

This presentation shows a simulation framework for high performance computing architectures built at the Computer architecture and system group of the university Carlos III de Madrid. The simulation framework is called SIMCAN (SIMulator Framework for Computer Architectures and Networks) which main characteristic is the ability to conÞgure itself for simulating a great number of possible architectures and to use any number of components within this architecture. SIMCAN is developed to simulate HPC architectures as a whole but putting special detail on the storage and network subsystems.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 25 February, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Leith

Semantically Enhanced Model Experiment Evaluation Process (SeMEEP) within the Atmospheric Chemistry Community

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Peter Dew (School of Computing, Leeds University)

This talk reports on an in-depth study of the application of e-Science within a chemical kinematics modelling community which is part of a much larger atmospheric science community. The origin of this study is the CombeChem project. This captured semantic provenance of experimental data from source to data preservation. The data was generated from physical experiments (rather than modeling) conducted by chemists. Jeremy Frey states that one of the challenges is to encourage modelling scientists to annotate a think, try & track process.

Date and time: 
Friday, 6 March, 2009 - 11:30
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Cramond

RAPID-ly Adding Domain-Specific Job Submission and Provenance Systems onto a Demonstrator e-Science Project

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
David Bacigalupo

Rapid is software for rapidly creating domain-specific portlet interfaces that allow jobs to be submitted to resources (e.g. Grid resources), including a wide range of features to "give computational science a friendly face".

In this seminar I will demo the results of my work on the FireGrid project since 1st Jan. in which I have been:

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 17 February, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
Leith
Projects: 

Making High Performance e-Science more Straightforward for Scientists to Use

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
David Bacigalupo

In this seminar I will be giving an overview of my work on two large e-Science and various e-Science related research projects working in a variety of teams at/with the Universities of Warwick, Edinburgh and Newcastle, IBM Research, IBM Hursley and BT, amongst others. One of the underlying themes of this work has been how to make high performance e-Science more straightforward for scientists and others to use.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 28 January, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
Dead

Life After OpenKnowledge: Future Research Directions

SSP Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Dave Robertson

The OpenKnowledge project has produced a system for sharing knowledge peer to peer, using process models as a rich source of context to illocutions between peers and thus given coordination a greater chance of success in open environments. Although it supplies "the answer" in the core parts of this activity, it also raises many opportunities for new research. I will talk about some of these and sketch a proposal for new research.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 13 January, 2009 - 11:00
Length: 
45 minutes
Location: 
IF115

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