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Data-intensive computing

Systems and problems that include huge data volumes and complex patterns of integration and interaction.

GeoScience meets Informatics

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Ian Main, Mark Naylor and Andrew Bell

The agenda of this meeting will be flexible, the aim is to provide the informaticians with an understanding of the specific challenges in monitoring, analysis and modelling of experimental and seismological data.

Date and time: 
Thursday, 1 April, 2010 - 11:00
Length: 
120 minutes
Location: 
IF116
Projects: 

Data-Intensive Research: realising the power of data

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited
Date and time: 
Sunday, 4 April, 2010 - 09:00
Location: 
Data Intensive eScience Workshop at the Database Systems for Advanced Applications, Tsukuba, Japan

Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Data-intensive refers to huge volumes of data, complex patterns of data integration and analysis, and intricate interactions between data and users. Current methods and tools are failing to address data-intensive challenges effectively. They fail for several reasons, all of which are aspects of scalability.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 28 April, 2010 - 10:30
Location: 
edikt2010 Symposium - Using computing in your research, e-Science Institute, 15 South College Street, Edinburgh

Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research

Presentation Type: 
demo

We present Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research, a research group in Edinburgh Informatics and part of the UK National e-Science Centre. The demonstration comprises several rounds of 15 minutes, where we briefly introduce the group (2-minutes), then attendees can pick people to talk to for the remaining time. All team members are there and have laptops to provide in-depth demonstrations of our methods and applications of them.

Date and time: 
Monday, 15 March, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
Data-Intensive Research Workshop, e-Science Institute, UK

A scientific gateway for real time geophysical experiments

The aim is to develop an open-access, automated, web-based platform for real-time data collation, analysis and information exchange for geophysical experiments. This scientific gateway should enable competing physical hypotheses and statistical methods for forecasting rock failure to be tested and developed in fully prospective mode in an open, testable environment comparable to say daily weather forecasts.

Acronym: 
IDEA29
Funding body: 
College of Science and Engineering, University of Edinburgh
Value: 
£24k
Dates: 
Mon, 03/01/2010 to Tue, 08/31/2010
Project members: 
Projects: 

Data-Intensive Research: Actions to make better use of Data for Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

Today’s challenges demand the best quality decisions that can be achieved. The growing wealth of available data should be used to improve those decisions. Data are the catalysts in research, engineering and diagnosis. Data fuel analysis to produce key evidence and supply the information for compelling communication. Data connect computational systems and capture the work of large collaborative endeavours.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 2 February, 2010 - 10:10
Location: 
EPSRC Infrastructure Strategic Advisory Team, London, UK
Research topics: 

Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

Data-intensive refers to huge volumes of data, complex patterns of data integration and analysis and intricate interactions between data and users. Current methods and tools are failing to address data-intensive challenges effectively: they fail for several reasons, all of which are aspects of scalability.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 23 February, 2010 - 12:20
Location: 
iDEA lab lunch, Informatics Forum, Edinburgh, UK

Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Science is witnessing a data revolution. Data are now created by faster and cheaper physical technologies, software tools and digital collaborations. Examples of these include satellite networks, simulation models and social network data. To transform these data successfully into information then into knowledge and finally into wisdom, we need new forms of computational thinking. These may be enabled by building "instruments" that make data comprehensible for the "naked mind" in a similar fashion to the way in which telescopes reveal the universe to the naked eye.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 9 February, 2010 - 09:30
Location: 
Seminar Room, Biomedical Systems Analysis, Human Genetics Unit, Medical Research Council, Edinburgh, UK

Data-Intensive Research at the UK National e-Science Centre

Presentation Type: 
talk

Presenting the research of the Data-Intensive Research Group as part of a visit of Professor Robin Stanton (Pro Vice-Chancellor) and Professor Lindsay Botten (Director, National Computational Infrastructure), Australian National University, to the UK National e-Science Centre.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 26 January, 2010 - 14:20
Location: 
Turing Room, Informatics Forum, Edinburgh, UK

Data-Intensive Research: how should we improve our ability to use data

Today there is a growing abundance of data often in large-scale collections or with great complexity. It is pertinent to every pressing strategic challenge, to the deep questions that research addresses and the urgent application science. A great deal of thought is needed to improve our capabilities to use data well in a wide variety of research endeavours. The workshop will bring together practitioners, theoreticians and technologists with a wide range of viewpoints to shape a strategy for the thinking and research that is needed.

Location: 
e-Science Institute, 15 South College Street, Edinburgh
Dates: 
15 Mar 2010 to 19 Mar 2010
Research topics: 

e-Science Research at Edinburgh and Glasgow

Presentation Type: 
talk

This presentation's focus is on the computer science research performed at the National e-Science Centre as part of the University of Edinburg and the University of Glasgow. Another submission reports on the community support offered by the National e-Science Centre.

Date and time: 
Monday, 7 December, 2009 - 09:30
Location: 
UK e-Science All Hands Meeting 2009, Oxford, UK
Projects: 

Facilitating Data Mining and Data Integration Using Parallel Pipeline Streaming

Presentation Type: 
poster

To explore, analyse and extract useful information and knowledge from massive amounts of data collected from geographically distributed sites, one has to overcome both data and computational intensive problems in distributed environments.

Date and time: 
Thursday, 10 December, 2009 - 12:30
Location: 
IEEE e-Science 2009, Oxford, UK
Projects: 

Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Science is witnessing a data revolution. Data are now created by faster and cheaper physical technologies, software tools and digital collaborations. Examples of these include satellite networks, simulation models and social network data. To transform these data successfully into information then into knowledge and finally into wisdom, we need new forms of computational thinking. These may be enabled by building "instruments" that make data comprehensible for the "naked mind" in a similar fashion to the way in which telescopes reveal the universe to the naked eye.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 27 January, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
Rm 6301, James Clerk Maxwell Building (JCMB), Kings Buildings
Research topics: 
Projects: 

RapidSeis: Rapid Portals for Seismological Waveform Data

Final project report for JISC, with links to all individually created deliverables and progress posts. RapidSeis has produced a scientific gateway via a web portal that allows seismologist to pick up data from Orfeus—the central repository for earthquake data in Europe—and then run several analyses on these data. Advanced users can also create new analyses and share these with all the other users.

Topic of this submission: 
Projects: 

RapidSeis Workshop

At the meeting we will present the result of the RapidSeis project, a collaboration between ORFEUS, the UK National e-Science Centre and the University of Liverpool. Over the past six months, this project has created a system that facilitates running waveform analysis on data from ORFEUS where the computation is performed on remote compute resources provided by the University of Liverpool.

Location: 
Department of Earth & Ocean Sciences, University of Liverpool, UK
Dates: 
12 Nov 2009 to 13 Nov 2009
Projects: 

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