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Collaborative environments

Computer-enabled environments that enable working collaboratively on tasks

RapidSeis: Enabling User-Defined Seismological Waveform Data Processing over the Grid

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

The objective of this JISC-funded pilot project was to remove perceived barriers to uptake of an application that performs analysis of seismic waveform data. The aim was to provide the seismological community with a simplified system that overcame important barriers such as installation and understanding of the analysis package, location and transfer of large amounts of input data and visualisation of results.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 4 May, 2010 - 10:30
Location: 
European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2010, Vienna, Austria
Projects: 

ShakeMapple : tapping laptop motion sensors to map the felt extents of an earthquake

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
poster

There is a significant pool of untapped sensor resources available in portable computer embedded motion sensors. Included primarily to detect sudden strong motion in order to park the disk heads to prevent damage to the disks in the event of a fall or other severe motion, these sensors may also be tapped for other uses as well. We have developed a system that takes advantage of the Apple Macintosh laptops’ embedded Sudden Motion Sensors to record earthquake strong motion data to rapidly build maps of where and to what extent an earthquake has been felt.

Date and time: 
Thursday, 6 May, 2010 - 08:00
Location: 
European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2010, Vienna, Austria

Toward a service-oriented e-infrastructure for data mining and data-intensive modeling applications in seismology

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

Global and regional seismology monitoring systems are continuously operated and are transmitting a growing wealth of seismological data in Europe and from around the world. This opens exciting opportunities for a large range of geophysical research. The multi-use nature of these data puts a great premium on open-access data archive infrastructures that are well integrated in the European Plate Observing System (EPOS)—an ESFRI initiative of the solid earth community.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 5 May, 2010 - 09:30
Location: 
European Geosciences Union

GeoScience meets Informatics

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Ian Main, Mark Naylor and Andrew Bell

The agenda of this meeting will be flexible, the aim is to provide the informaticians with an understanding of the specific challenges in monitoring, analysis and modelling of experimental and seismological data.

Date and time: 
Thursday, 1 April, 2010 - 11:00
Length: 
120 minutes
Location: 
IF116
Projects: 

Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Data-intensive refers to huge volumes of data, complex patterns of data integration and analysis, and intricate interactions between data and users. Current methods and tools are failing to address data-intensive challenges effectively. They fail for several reasons, all of which are aspects of scalability.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 28 April, 2010 - 10:30
Location: 
edikt2010 Symposium - Using computing in your research, e-Science Institute, 15 South College Street, Edinburgh

Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research

Presentation Type: 
demo

We present Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research, a research group in Edinburgh Informatics and part of the UK National e-Science Centre. The demonstration comprises several rounds of 15 minutes, where we briefly introduce the group (2-minutes), then attendees can pick people to talk to for the remaining time. All team members are there and have laptops to provide in-depth demonstrations of our methods and applications of them.

Date and time: 
Monday, 15 March, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
Data-Intensive Research Workshop, e-Science Institute, UK

A scientific gateway for real time geophysical experiments

The aim is to develop an open-access, automated, web-based platform for real-time data collation, analysis and information exchange for geophysical experiments. This scientific gateway should enable competing physical hypotheses and statistical methods for forecasting rock failure to be tested and developed in fully prospective mode in an open, testable environment comparable to say daily weather forecasts.

Acronym: 
IDEA29
Funding body: 
College of Science and Engineering, University of Edinburgh
Value: 
£24k
Dates: 
Mon, 03/01/2010 to Tue, 08/31/2010
Project members: 
Projects: 

Rapid: giving computational science a friendly face

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Rapid is a cost-effective and efficient way of designing and delivering portal interfaces to applications that require remote compute resources. The aim of Rapid is to make completing these tasks as simple as ordering a DVD or booking a flight on the web.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 13 May, 2009 - 11:30
Location: 
Computational Chemistry Symposium, ScotCHEM 2009, Heriot-Watt, Edinburgh, UK.
Projects: 

The Next-Generation Embryology Project

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
demo

Demonstration of the Next Generation Embryology portal (prototype, version 0.1) at Newcastle University.

Date and time: 
Friday, 26 February, 2010 - 15:00
Location: 
Newcastle University, United Kingdom
Research topics: 

Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

Data-intensive refers to huge volumes of data, complex patterns of data integration and analysis and intricate interactions between data and users. Current methods and tools are failing to address data-intensive challenges effectively: they fail for several reasons, all of which are aspects of scalability.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 23 February, 2010 - 12:20
Location: 
iDEA lab lunch, Informatics Forum, Edinburgh, UK

Screencast: annotating embryo models on-line in a web browser

Screencast of a prototype for the JISC-funded project "Next Generation Embryology" where biologists can annotate 3D objects that represent models of mouse and human embryos with arbitrary bits of information held in a DSpace repository. Here we show what the interface looks like.

Topic of this submission: 

Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Science is witnessing a data revolution. Data are now created by faster and cheaper physical technologies, software tools and digital collaborations. Examples of these include satellite networks, simulation models and social network data. To transform these data successfully into information then into knowledge and finally into wisdom, we need new forms of computational thinking. These may be enabled by building "instruments" that make data comprehensible for the "naked mind" in a similar fashion to the way in which telescopes reveal the universe to the naked eye.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 9 February, 2010 - 09:30
Location: 
Seminar Room, Biomedical Systems Analysis, Human Genetics Unit, Medical Research Council, Edinburgh, UK

Data-Intensive Research at the UK National e-Science Centre

Presentation Type: 
talk

Presenting the research of the Data-Intensive Research Group as part of a visit of Professor Robin Stanton (Pro Vice-Chancellor) and Professor Lindsay Botten (Director, National Computational Infrastructure), Australian National University, to the UK National e-Science Centre.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 26 January, 2010 - 14:20
Location: 
Turing Room, Informatics Forum, Edinburgh, UK

Automated MRI Quality Assurance Data Collection and Analysis

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

Quality Assurance (QA) is used to monitor the performance of MRI scanners and this is particularly important in multicentre imaging studies. In SINAPSE (Scottish Imaging Network a Platform for Scientific Excellence) a common QA protocol was agreed after studying the different QA protocols being used in the seven participant MR scanners in four centres and analysing the needs of multicentre studies. This common protocol provides a framework for monitoring the quality of the data obtained in the different centres to help facilitate the combination of data between centres.

Date and time: 
Friday, 26 March, 2010 - 15:40
Location: 
Edinburgh Training & Conference Centre, 16 St. Mary's Street, Edinburgh, UK
Projects: 

Flybrain Neuron Database, a comprehensive online database of the Drosophila brain neurons

ANC Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Pro Kei Ito

Morphological and functional knowledge of the neurons of the Drosophila melanogaster brain has been accumulated drastically, thanks to the recent improvements in visualization techniques. Identified neurons, however, have been reported in diverse publications with inconsistent formats, making it very difficult to acquire comprehensive overview about what is known and what remains uninvestigated. To address this problem, we developed an online database, called Flybrain Neuron Database, which aims to collect information about all the Drosophila brain neurons reported so far.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 19 January, 2010 - 11:00
Length: 
60 minutes
Location: 
IF431
Projects: 

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