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Intuitive interfaces

Computer interfaces that require little to no effort to learn to use

Screencast: Rapid Portal for real time geophysical experiments

Below a screencast of the first prototype of the scientific gateway for real time geophysical experiments. This portal was created using Rapid.

Topic of this submission: 
Projects: 

Publicity flyer for Next Generation Embryology

The Next Generation Embryology project is funded by JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee), a sponsor that supports education and research by promoting innovation in new technologies. The attached PDF flyer provides a brief introduction to the main aims of the project.

Topic of this submission: 

Next Generation Embryology: Using 3D embryo atlas frameworks for research and education

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

3D developmental atlases are used in research for capture, collation and analysis of spatio‐ temporal data such as in situ gene‐expression. The most advanced systems are based on a temporal series of 3D models. Examples are the EADHB human embryo atlas in Newcastle and the e‐MouseAtlas in Edinburgh. In this project, we use the 3D spatio‐temporal frameworks in conjunction with a repository to deliver research and educational materials directly in the context of the developing embryo.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 11 May, 2010 - 13:20
Location: 
The Influence and Impact of Web 2.0 on Various Applications, e-Science Institute, Edinburgh, UK

RapidSeis: Enabling User-Defined Seismological Waveform Data Processing over the Grid

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

The objective of this JISC-funded pilot project was to remove perceived barriers to uptake of an application that performs analysis of seismic waveform data. The aim was to provide the seismological community with a simplified system that overcame important barriers such as installation and understanding of the analysis package, location and transfer of large amounts of input data and visualisation of results.

Date and time: 
Tuesday, 4 May, 2010 - 10:30
Location: 
European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2010, Vienna, Austria
Projects: 

ShakeMapple : tapping laptop motion sensors to map the felt extents of an earthquake

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
poster

There is a significant pool of untapped sensor resources available in portable computer embedded motion sensors. Included primarily to detect sudden strong motion in order to park the disk heads to prevent damage to the disks in the event of a fall or other severe motion, these sensors may also be tapped for other uses as well. We have developed a system that takes advantage of the Apple Macintosh laptops’ embedded Sudden Motion Sensors to record earthquake strong motion data to rapidly build maps of where and to what extent an earthquake has been felt.

Date and time: 
Thursday, 6 May, 2010 - 08:00
Location: 
European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2010, Vienna, Austria

Toward a service-oriented e-infrastructure for data mining and data-intensive modeling applications in seismology

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
talk

Global and regional seismology monitoring systems are continuously operated and are transmitting a growing wealth of seismological data in Europe and from around the world. This opens exciting opportunities for a large range of geophysical research. The multi-use nature of these data puts a great premium on open-access data archive infrastructures that are well integrated in the European Plate Observing System (EPOS)—an ESFRI initiative of the solid earth community.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 5 May, 2010 - 09:30
Location: 
European Geosciences Union

GeoScience meets Informatics

NeSC Research Seminar Series
Speaker: 
Ian Main, Mark Naylor and Andrew Bell

The agenda of this meeting will be flexible, the aim is to provide the informaticians with an understanding of the specific challenges in monitoring, analysis and modelling of experimental and seismological data.

Date and time: 
Thursday, 1 April, 2010 - 11:00
Length: 
120 minutes
Location: 
IF116
Projects: 

Data-Intensive Research: realising the power of data

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited
Date and time: 
Sunday, 4 April, 2010 - 09:00
Location: 
Data Intensive eScience Workshop at the Database Systems for Advanced Applications, Tsukuba, Japan

Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Data-intensive refers to huge volumes of data, complex patterns of data integration and analysis, and intricate interactions between data and users. Current methods and tools are failing to address data-intensive challenges effectively. They fail for several reasons, all of which are aspects of scalability.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 28 April, 2010 - 10:30
Location: 
edikt2010 Symposium - Using computing in your research, e-Science Institute, 15 South College Street, Edinburgh

Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research

Presentation Type: 
demo

We present Edinburgh Data-Intensive Research, a research group in Edinburgh Informatics and part of the UK National e-Science Centre. The demonstration comprises several rounds of 15 minutes, where we briefly introduce the group (2-minutes), then attendees can pick people to talk to for the remaining time. All team members are there and have laptops to provide in-depth demonstrations of our methods and applications of them.

Date and time: 
Monday, 15 March, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
Data-Intensive Research Workshop, e-Science Institute, UK

Rapid featured in the newsletter of the Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology

RapidSeis: a NERIES spin-off pilot

The objective of this six-month pilot project was to provide a simplified system to perform analysis of seismic waveform data through a web browser. The specific aims were that no data or application be download to the user’s computer, for the user to create algorithms to customise the analysis and to allow sharing of algorithms within the seismological community.

Topic of this submission: 
Research topics: 
Projects: 

A scientific gateway for real time geophysical experiments

The aim is to develop an open-access, automated, web-based platform for real-time data collation, analysis and information exchange for geophysical experiments. This scientific gateway should enable competing physical hypotheses and statistical methods for forecasting rock failure to be tested and developed in fully prospective mode in an open, testable environment comparable to say daily weather forecasts.

Acronym: 
IDEA29
Funding body: 
College of Science and Engineering, University of Edinburgh
Value: 
£24k
Dates: 
Mon, 03/01/2010 to Tue, 08/31/2010
Project members: 
Projects: 

Rapid development of computational web portals

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Rapid is a cost-effective and efficient way of designing and delivering portal interfaces to applications that require remote compute resources. The aim of Rapid is to make completing these tasks as simple as ordering a DVD or booking a flight on the web.

Date and time: 
Friday, 12 February, 2010 - 12:00
Location: 
White Rose Grid e-Science Centre, York, UK
Research topics: 
Projects: 

Rapid: giving computational science a friendly face

Speaker(s): 
Presentation Type: 
invited

Rapid is a cost-effective and efficient way of designing and delivering portal interfaces to applications that require remote compute resources. The aim of Rapid is to make completing these tasks as simple as ordering a DVD or booking a flight on the web.

Date and time: 
Wednesday, 13 May, 2009 - 11:30
Location: 
Computational Chemistry Symposium, ScotCHEM 2009, Heriot-Watt, Edinburgh, UK.
Projects: 

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